Probate and Elder Law FAQ

Questions you should get an answer to without having to pay anybody

We have a really complicated legal system. I do not think that is strictly a bad thing because this legal system is what assures us our rights and privileges. It is, however, very complicated and difficult for people without a legal education to understand. Many times, people do not even know that they need to use the powers of that legal system, much less how to do so. I have prepared these web pages to give you more information about Missouri probate law. Really, you might not even realize that all of the topics that I discuss are about probate law. Some of them you might think of as family law as they relate to minors, others as elder law as it relates to senior citizens, others you might think of as mental health law, but really all of the topics I discuss here fall into the category of probate law in the State of Missouri.

I hope you will use these sections to better understand the law as it affects you with regard to probate. The information provided on these pages is provided as a service to the Internet community and does not constitute legal advice. Most of the pages explain to you certain areas of the law so that you can better obtain legal advice. I have tried to provide quality information, but I do not want to make any claims, promises or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of that information. The information contained on this site does not constitute legal advice and you should not believe that you have entered into an attorney client relationship with an attorney because you have viewed this page. All legal advice must be tailored to the specific circumstances of individual cases through consultation with your attorney. Furthermore, laws are constantly changing and nothing provided herein should be used as a substitute for the advice of an attorney.

Naturally, I hope that you will contact me to be your attorney. One final note, since this is provided to the internet community as a whole, I should be certain that you realize that all of my commentaries about Probate Law are restricted strictly to Missouri law. All of the information contained herein is only about Missouri law. You should contact a local attorney who is a specialist in your state’s laws.

The information contained on this site does not constitute legal advice and you should not believe that you have entered into an attorney client relationship with an attorney because you have viewed this page.
- Thomas G. Glick


Probate law can generally be divided onto three categories based on the type of people it affects. The first is adults, generally adults suffering from mental illness or who have become incapacitated or disabled. The second category is minors, which are people who have not yet turned 18 years of age in the state of Missouri. And finally, the category that most people know about, the estates of decedents, which means people who have died.



Probate as it affects the estates of adults


What is a conservator?

What is a guardian (for an adult)?

How can I be prepared if I become disabled?

How does a guardianship terminate?

How does a conservatorship terminate?

How do I write a living will?

Do I need a will?

What is a power of attorney?
 

Probate as it affects minors

What is a conservator?

What is a guardian?

How does a guardianship for a minor terminate?

How does a conservatorship for a minor terminate?

Who will take care of my children if I cannot?

How do I deal with money that my child has inherited or received in a settlement?

How can I give money to a minor without involving the court?

What is a custodian?

 
 

Probate as it affects people who have died


What is a will?

What if I die without a will?

What do I need to prepare to be able to write a will?

What is probate?

What is a trust?

What is joint-tenancy?

Do I need a will?

How do I contest a will?

How do I stop someone else from taking money or property that should go to me?

How do I change the title on bank accounts, cars, or land?

How do I file a claim against someone who has died?

How do I collect money that someone owed me before they died?
 
 Neither the Supreme Court of Missouri nor the Missouri Bar reviews or approves certifying organizations or specialist designations.